10th Annual Sweater Funk Steps Twice on MLK SUN 1/14 at  on Sunday, January 14th, 2018

10th Annual Sweater Funk Steps Twice on MLK SUN 1/14 at on Sunday, January 14th, 2018

Join us on Sunday January 14th, 2018 for our 10th Annual SWEATER FUNK STEPS TWICE – All Steppers – All Night!

Every Sunday for the past 10 YEARS, we’ve been on a mission to share the deepest boogie, two step and modern soul original records and do it for the love.

Twice a year during the MLK Weekend and in late summer we dedicate a night to all steppers. – All Two Step Soul, All Night!
It’s a time to get suited and booted, let’s step in the name of love, Monday’s a holiday.

The Knockout, San Francisco
10pm, 21+, Always Free on Sundays.

What is “Two-step” soul?
“Two-step” soul is style of soul music initially popularized by UK reggae djs in the mid ’70s as a change of pace to the all-night reggae sound system parties. The soul tracks selected tended to be mid-tempo and was differentiated from the uptempo driving disco style popular in most clubs at the time. The key to the genre was the short shuffle, swing or pause that created a cha-cha like rhythm and lead the way to partner style touch dancing similar to salsa or slow jive. Another key feature was that it blended perfectly with the reggae of that era, coinciding with the development of “lovers rock”.

In other parts of the world, similar styles evolved that share the “two-step” feel. Along the Carolina coast, folks were “shagging” since the ’60s and the soul music selected is essentially “two step” soul. In Chicago and the Midwest, the term “steppin” emerged to define a similar development. Athough each area has their own unique flavor and style, they all share a love of the mid-tempo feel, an affinity towards dancing with your partner and an aspirational ethos that lends itself to getting “suited & booted” in your best gear.

By the early ’80s the name “two-step” began to stick and certain djs made it their specialty. Many soul artists from the ’70s until today have songs that have become “two-step” classics but the style is more about individual songs than any particular artists. A few tracks that many view as an essential examples of “two-step” are Natalie Cole’s massive hit – “This Will Be” from 1975 or Luther Ingram’s – “Do You Love Somebody” from 1978. More recently, R. Kelly’s – “Step In The Name Of Love” is a contemporary “two-step” track that continues to light it up and has become an anthem for the genre.

Next time you listen to a new jack swing or J-Dilla track, that slight pause that “hooks you” is essentially a two-step beat with louder snare or bass. Whether uptempo or downtempo, steppers have been keepin’ the smooth groovers going for decades. At Sweater Funk, it’s no different. Twice a year during on the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Weekend in January, and in late Summer, we present our tribute to Two-Step Soul, we hope you can join us!

Summary
Event
10th Annual Sweater Funk Steps Twice on MLK SUN 1/14 at on Sunday, January 14th, 2018
Starting on
2018-01-14
Ending on
2018-01-15
Description
Join us on Sunday January 14th, 2018 for our 10th Annual SWEATER FUNK STEPS TWICE - All Steppers - All Night! Every Sunday for the past 10 YEARS, we've been on a mission to share the deepest boogie, two step and modern soul original records and do it for the love. Twice a year during the MLK Weekend and in late summer we dedicate a night to all steppers. - All Two Step Soul, All Night! It's a time to get suited and booted, let's step in the name of love, Monday's a holiday. The Knockout, San Francisco 10pm, 21+, Always Free on Sundays. What is "Two-step" soul? "Two-step" soul is style of soul music initially popularized by UK reggae djs in the mid '70s as a change of pace to the all-night reggae sound system parties. The soul tracks selected tended to be mid-tempo and was differentiated from the uptempo driving disco style popular in most clubs at the time. The key to the genre was the short shuffle, swing or pause that created a cha-cha like rhythm and lead the way to partner style touch dancing similar to salsa or slow jive. Another key feature was that it blended perfectly with the reggae of that era, coinciding with the development of "lovers rock". In other parts of the world, similar styles evolved that share the "two-step" feel. Along the Carolina coast, folks were "shagging" since the '60s and the soul music selected is essentially "two step" soul. In Chicago and the Midwest, the term "steppin" emerged to define a similar development. Athough each area has their own unique flavor and style, they all share a love of the mid-tempo feel, an affinity towards dancing with your partner and an aspirational ethos that lends itself to getting "suited & booted" in your best gear. By the early '80s the name "two-step" began to stick and certain djs made it their specialty. Many soul artists from the '70s until today have songs that have become "two-step" classics but the style is more about individual songs than any particular artists. A few tracks that many view as an essential examples of "two-step" are Natalie Cole's massive hit - "This Will Be" from 1975 or Luther Ingram's - "Do You Love Somebody" from 1978. More recently, R. Kelly's - "Step In The Name Of Love" is a contemporary "two-step" track that continues to light it up and has become an anthem for the genre. Next time you listen to a new jack swing or J-Dilla track, that slight pause that "hooks you" is essentially a two-step beat with louder snare or bass. Whether uptempo or downtempo, steppers have been keepin' the smooth groovers going for decades. At Sweater Funk, it's no different. Twice a year during on the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Weekend in January, and in late Summer, we present our tribute to Two-Step Soul, we hope you can join us!
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